TN64 The Conference Calls 09 Oct 11

CCalls09Oct11

The one where we talk about ‘misID/hoaxers’: we look at The Sun’s ‘Portsmouth Penguin’; we move smoothly onto an ID cock-up by one of our own; glide effortlessly into discussing hoaxes, lies, and downright shysters; shudder to a halt as we wonder why someone called Joe Pell wouldn’t come on and talk to us; head up a diversion to ‘singing butterflies’ and DairyleaTM cheese slices; then get back on track again as we set the record straight about the Bolton Abbey Rock Bunting. We also have a pre-recorded interview with BugLife about earwigs.


NB: All opinions and views expressed by an individual panel member and/or guest during a Conference Calls podcast are those of the individual speaker alone, and are not to be taken as being held by or representative of any other individual, organisation, or sponsor unless specifically identified as such during the recording of that podcast.

 

Show Notes

And your Panel today consists of…

  • Charlie Moores, a freelance writer and podcaster (and now sadly intermittent birder) who either lives in a warm little cottage in north Wiltshire with his family or in a cold ‘podding shed’ editing an endless series of podcasts that more and more people appear to now be listening to.
  • John Hague, a birding psychiatric nurse from Barnsley who now lives in Leicester where he’s a prominent member of the Leicester and Rutland Ornithological Society. John blogs extensively at The Drunkbirder where he rants “about the world and the absurdities of life“.
  • Tom McKinney, the Derbyshire-based birder and award-winning musician who founded The House of Bedlam and gigs as part of Tango 5, and author of the much-missed Skills Bills blog. Tom now blogs weekly at Birdingblogs.com/TomMcKinney.
  • Nick Moran, an expat Yorkshireman living in Norfolk, where he runs BirdTrack at the BTO. Nick spent most of the noughties birding and occasionally teaching Biology in China and the UAE; he is an OSME Council member and secretary and voting member on the Emirates Bird Records Committee which keeps him in touch with Middle East birding.

 


 

Links

 



Northern Bald Ibis Geronticus eremita.
Copyright Ralph Steadman for the http://www.facebook.com/ghostsofgonebirds

 

 


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About the author

Passionate about animal welfare and conservation, veggie and dairy-free, I live in the Wiltshire (UK) countryside. I birded the world for twenty years before quitting my airline job and am now freelance. I co-founded Birders Against Wildlife Crime and Birds Korea. Trustee of the League against Cruel Sports On Twitter @charliemoores

4 Comments

  1. Simon says:

    It is the chrysalis that ‘sings’. Peacock butterflies sometimes hiss if they’re cross.
    200 years ago it was noted that the pupa of the Green Hairstreak Butterfly produced squeaks and clucking murmurings. It is communicating with the ants that lick the secretions from the chrysalis. The sound is loud enough to be audible to the human ear.
    Try this link
    http://www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/Strange%20but%20true%204.htm

  2. Charlie says:

    Thanks Simon – that’s GREAT! I knew there had to be someone out there who knows more than us about singing butterflies (as we knew nothing at all the chances had to be good) – even better that it’s someone I know who has commented without telling us we’re twits :) Cheers!

  3. I thought you said nobody ever leaves any comments. I make that three on the latest show alone.

  4. Charlie says:

    Hi Richard (love your website by the way) – yes, three – one is mine tho, one is yours commenting on the comments, and just one is a proper comment commenting on the podcast. I’m not complaining, but it’s not quite what I was hoping for :)

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